dannielle:

RMM: What are your dislikes, either musically, or in the music industry, or even in real life? 

LO: Oh boy. Dislikes. In typing out this answer, it kinda turned into an essay. Aren’t email interviews the best? Here we go.

As a woman making music and posting it on the internet, I’ve grown pretty weary of the different standards applied to men and women and the contrasting reactions to very similar products from both. The older I get, the less patience I have for it. I’ve put a lot of videos on YouTube over the years (which one could say is “asking for it”, but fuck that), and it’s unfortunately been pretty illuminating.

Sure, there are people who are trolling and say awful, sexist, sometimes violent things, which is inexcusable. Everyone knows this. What I’m more bothered by is the people who think they’re being complimentary, or at least neutral. It’s mostly comments about my appearance. When I’ve put so much work into this song and video, arranging and playing these parts, mixing and mastering this song, it blows my mind that anyone can think it’s appropriate or relevant to talk about my hair, or weigh in on which of my outfits was the cutest. Tell me the vocals were too loud. Tell me the bassline sucks. Tell me you loved/hated the song and you don’t know why. The visual element can matter, sure. Watching someone perform and be expressive can affect your reaction to the song. But my hair? I’m trying to communicate something, and it has nothing to do with hair. To tell me that you walked away from my video thinking about hair is to tell me that I’ve failed.

But how can I change this? As a musician who is trying to present music to the world, it begins to feel like a lose-lose. How do I make all of this stuff not matter? Is there a way to dress on camera in order to not have people comment on my clothes or my body? My guess is no, but if there were, should I have to conform to that in order for my work to be front and center? It’s hard to know if I’ve succeeded with a message when it’s inevitably weighed down (or raised up, or dragged a thousand miles east or west) by something else that I never wanted to communicate at all.

If a woman desexualizes herself entirely, then that becomes the focus. If a guy is playing music in a hoodie or his pajamas, he’s down-to-earth and it’s awesome (no really, it probably is), but for a woman to dress in unflattering or frumpy clothes is for her to somehow spit in the face of the universe and its gifts (e.g., gossip magazines shaming Ellen Page for wearing sweatpants to the gym). The gifts imparted by the universe unto a woman, it is understood, are intended for the entire world and for her to hide them is selfish and ungrateful (unless of course she’s ugly, in which case a shapeless outfit represents the merciful gift of invisibility). The desexualized woman is either lowering herself or unworthy of interest in the first place.

I also hear from people saying that I should show my face and smile more. If you are my grandmother, this request is acceptable. If you are not my grandmother, I can only assume that you’ve never heard my music.

Then there is the assumption that women are incapable of (or uninterested in) anything requiring technical prowess. When I recorded an EP with my friend Nataly Dawn a few years ago, people were asking who produced it. We did. The recording process was transparent as we filmed it in our home studio, but some viewers assumed they were missing something. If you observe other examples of this video format (known as a “VideoSong”) on YouTube, this is not a question that men are asked. It is assumed, usually correctly, that it is a format for the DIY artist. Apparently DIY for two women just means that we did our own hair and makeup.

To be clear, the world has plenty of people who are listening to music intelligently and not perpetuating these issues. I’m fortunate enough to have many of them as fans. A lot of them do post thoughtful responses to my music on YouTube or on other forums. What’s more, I also try to remind myself that a large number of these listeners who “get it” are not people who comment on YouTube videos, so perhaps the observable ratio of relevant to irrelevant feedback does not represent people’s reactions on the whole. All of this gives me hope. Still, we have a problem.

In conclusion, I dislike that it’s difficult for a woman to have her work be valued as a separate entity from her appearance or sexuality. To be visible at all as a woman, it seems, is to encourage people to miss the point. None of this is news, obviously, but dammit, I dislike it.

Also olives. Never been a fan of those.

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8 hours ago/ 141 notes

venusaurphobia:

Being a Christian doesn’t mean you have to be anti-science. I do believe in The Big Bang Theory, I just don’t think it’s funny or deserves six seasons.

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8 hours ago/ 28,024 notes

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I no longer know if I wish to drown myself in love, vodka or the sea.
— Grantaire, Book V  (via m—e—m—e—n—t—o)

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8 hours ago/ 165,509 notes

lordofsilverfountain:

" ‘Come, Mr. Frodo!’ he cried.’ I can’t carry it for you, but I can carry you and it aswell. So up you get! Come on, Mr. Frodo dear! Sam will give you a ride. Just tell him where to go, and he’ll go.’ " ~ quotes from book

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9 hours ago/ 564 notes

mc-jaeger:

jean-huh-kirschnickerdoodle:

being a capable writer:
image

having the urge to write:
image

having a list of fic ideas:
image

having new ideas get in the way of old ones:
image

not having the inspiration/motivation to write:
image

Conclusion; Jack Sparrow is my creative mind:
image

And when you write something amazing and you love it and you share it and it’s still amazing and people love it and you’ll never be able to do anything like it ever again and you’re just likeimage

(via kittens-with-katanas)

23 hours ago/ 22,781 notes
Potter has done too much for me for me to ever want to shit all over it. I’m never going to say: ‘Don’t ask me questions about that’. I remember reading an interview with Robert Smith from The Cure. Somebody said to him: ‘Why do you still wear all that makeup, don’t you feel a bit past it?’ And he said: ‘There are still 14-year-olds coming to see The Cure for the first time, dressed like that. I’d never want to make them feel silly.’ It’s a similar thing with Potter. People are still discovering those books and films. It would be awful for them to find out the people involved had turned their backs on it. Though sometimes, people do come up and say ‘I loved you in The Woman in Black,’ which is really sweet. That’s them knowing that it matters to me that I’ve done other stuff.
— Daniel Radcliffe for London Magazine (x)

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23 hours ago/ 10,543 notes

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1 day ago/ 54 notes

ravendorkholme:

You can tell a lot about someone from how intensely they get into Bohemian Rhapsody

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1 day ago/ 281,911 notes

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